The Worldwide Weblog of Donald Pincher

by Joshua Gaskell

Tag: Television

Sunday, 21st August 2016

The characters from The Office discuss the possibility of a second EU referendum:

The Second Referendum

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Tuesday, 2nd June 2015

I propose a spin-off from the OUD: The Oxford (Urban) Dictionary of (Really) Modern Quotations.

On the subject of collections of related items, especially DVDs of television programmes, packaged and sold together in a box…

Marcel Proust, French novelist, essayist, and critic:

I have a horror of boxsets, they’re so romantic, so operatic.

Geoffrey Madan, English bibliophile:

The dust of exploded beliefs may make a fine boxset.

Tuesday, 19th May 2015

Dear advertisers and TV development people,

The Great in Great British and Great Britain – a name I adopted by proclamation after the Union of the Crowns – is a geographical term used to distinguish the largest of the British Isles from Brittany, or Little Britain. It is not a general term of approval.

Best,

James the first by the grace of God
Kinge of great Brittayne ~
Fraunce, Ireland, and the
adiacent Islandes ~
Defender of the
Faith.

Tuesday, 28th April 2015

In the Sunday Times Culture magazine – in an anti-BBC piece that’s also, incidentally, a review of W1A – A. A. Gill makes the extraordinary claim that ‘Satire is amoral and indiscriminate.’ And there was me thinking that satire intends to expose and criticise prevailing immorality.

Gill ends his assessment of W1A by quoting Jonathan Swift, to little apparent purpose. (The quote – ‘Satire is a sort of glass…’ – is the very first of fifty-five Swiftianisms in the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, but I’m sure this is a coincidence.) Swift, a man keenly remembered for being, er, amoral and indiscriminate. Or was it highly moral and discriminating…

Will this do?

Sunday, 15th March 2015

I wonder if American television dramas are as exciting as they are not because of great teams of highly professionalised writers, and large budgets, but simply because they depict a real, contemporary world in which anyone at any time might pull out a gun and start firing it. The perennial ‘where’s the jeopardy?’ question is sort of answered by default.

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